Jul
10
2018
Dogs older than 10 years and cats older than 14 years are considered geriatric, not senior, according to Mary Gardner, DVM: “Geriatric pets do not have the same issues as senior pets and need to be treated differently. Educating clients and providing useful tips helps the pet and family members, who usually are frustrated and scared of what lies ahead.”...more
Jul
9
2018
Indigenous North American peoples endured horrible suffering and devastating loss at the hands of European settlers who began arriving in the New World in the early fifteenth century. Indigenous North American dogs may have had it nearly as bad. According to new research, ancient dogs, who arrived in the Americas alongside humans more than 10,000 years ago, were almost completely wiped out by European colonization. ...more
Jul
5
2018
This week: A former president gets a service dog, Jaguars get a dog park, and pet meds may help humans, too. ...more
Jul
3
2018
Research shows that pet owners are willing to make changes and embrace preventive healthcare visits if they know it will benefit their pets. But for pet owners to find value in the recommendations of veterinary professionals and be motivated by their advice, there must be effective communication between the healthcare team and pet owners. ...more
Jul
2
2018
Fourth of July fireworks are a blast for people, but they’re not much fun for pets. Noisy fireworks can scare pets and cause them to run away. According to statistics, animal control officials across the country see a 30–60% increase in lost pets each year between July fourth and sixth. In fact, July fifth is traditionally one of the busiest days of the year for animal shelters. ...more
Jun
29
2018
How did a wild, fierce, nocturnal predator like the wolf evolve over the course of millennia into a friendly, domesticated companion who likes to sleep on our beds at night? Evolutionary genetics says it’s in the genes, but which genes? A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan may point to an answer. ...more
Jun
28
2018
When it comes to practice culture, you can either lead or be led. According to veterinarian, psychologist, and Connexity by AAHA learning facilitator, John Jacobson, DVM, PhD, MS, a leader’s behavior influences the people and the practice culture, not the other way around. “When the leader is aware of unhelpful psychological processes that we all experience as part of the human condition, they are more able to respond intentionally in service of the culture they would like to create,” he said. AAHA recently asked Jacobson about the topics he’ll be covering at Connexity by AAHA, why “culture” and “wellbeing” are more than buzzwords, and his tips for living the best life possible. ...more
Jun
28
2018
This week: The world’s ugliest dog is crowned, we say goodbye to a talking gorilla, and a dog performs CPR—or does he? ...more
The Standard of Veterinary Excellence ®
American Animal Hospital Association | Copyright © 2018 | Privacy Statement | Contact Us