Jan
19
2018
Why do dogs eat poop? Theories abound: They’re bored; they have enzyme deficiencies; it’s a problem with the pancreas; they do it for attention (if so, it’s working, but maybe not the way they were hoping); they like the taste (ugh); and, most annoying of all ...more
Jan
15
2018
It’s like the paleo diet, only for pets. Grain-free, all-meat, and raw-food diets are hugely popular with pet owners who like the idea of feeding their cats and dogs a diet that’s closer to what their ancestor ate in the wilds. The problem is, there’s no hard, scientific evidence that raw meat–based diets (RMBDs) are any healthier than traditional dry or canned pet foods. ...more
Jan
12
2018
How can you tell if a dog is a pessimist or an optimist? Check his paws. A recent study indicates that a dog’s paw preference (righty or lefty) can be a predictor of how well he responds to and deals with emotional and environmental stress. ...more
Jan
3
2018
A team of researchers in Italy set out to find if there was any statistical correlation between behavioral problems in dogs and various factors such as size, age, sex, mounting behavior, where the dog sleeps, and where the dog came from (e.g., a shelter or acquired from another person).Turns out, there is. ...more
Dec
28
2017
This week: checking for microchips becomes law in New York, why more dogs aren't sniffing out cancer, and nipping compassion fatigue in the bud ...more
Dec
26
2017
Veterinarians and computer scientists at University of California-Davis are teaming up to determine if they can use facial recognition to identify pain in animals. They’re making progress. ...more
Dec
19
2017
With a budget of $32 million, and more than three thousand exuberant, tail-wagging test subjects, the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study is the largest and most comprehensive observational study ever attempted in veterinary medicine in the Unites States. ...more
Dec
15
2017
Multipurpose canines (MPC) are the Navy Seals of military working dogs. Highly trained, uniquely skilled, and almost unstoppable.Strapped to their human handlers, they leap from helicopters and rappel down sheer cliffs. They sniff out explosives, track down enemy insurgents, and they’ll take a bullet to protect the men and women they serve with. Which means they get hurt. ...more
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