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True or False? Accreditation Trivia

1/13: In order to be accredited, I must employ credentialed technicians.

You are correct!
While AAHA encourages practices to have credentialed technicians because we recognize the skills and knowledge they bring to the profession, it is not required to be accredited.

The answer is False.
AAHA encourages practices to have credentialed technicians because we recognize the skills and knowledge they bring; however, it is not required to be AAHA accredited.

2/13: I have to become a member before I can find out what the standards are all about.



You are correct!
We can provide you with access to the AAHA Standards of Accreditation in an online self-evaluation tool so you can view the standards and self-score your practice. Give us a call and we’ll set it up!

The answer is False.
We can provide nonmembers access to a free, online self-evaluation tool that lets you view the standards and self-score your hospital. The standards are customized to your practice and all answers are saved in case you decide to move forward. You may be closer than you think to achieving accreditation!

3/13: I'm too busy and will never have time to be 100% ready.



You are correct!
The timeframe for moving forward is up to you. If you involve your team and don’t try to do it all yourself your outcome will be enhanced and your team filled with pride. We provide personalized coaching for your team and resources to help you every step of the way.

The answer is False.
You don’t have to be 100% ready – your timeframe is entirely up to you! We provide personalized coaching for your team and resources to help you every step of the way.

4/13: Our practice must have a single purpose surgical suite.



You are correct!
Surgery suites should be set aside and used only for aseptic surgical procedures. Only equipment and supplies used specifically for aseptic surgical procedures should be stored in the surgery suite. Doors should be closed and traffic limited in and out of the surgical suite. This is one of the mandatory standards that must be met to be eligible for accreditation.

The answer is True.
Surgery suites should be set aside and used only for aseptic surgical procedures. Only equipment and supplies used specifically for aseptic surgical procedures should be stored in the surgery suite. Doors should be closed and traffic limited in and out of the surgical suite. This is one of the mandatory standards that must be met to be eligible for accreditation.

5/13: Standards require that pain assessment is considered part of every patient evaluation regardless of the presenting compliant.



You are correct!
All animals experience pain and they’re also very good at hiding it. If you’re not looking for pain, you may not be aware of it. This is one of the mandatory standards that must be met to be eligible for accreditation.

The answer is True.
All animals experience pain and they’re also very good at hiding it. If you’re not looking for pain, you may not be aware of it. This is one of the mandatory standards that must be met to be eligible for accreditation.

6/13: The process to become AAHA accredited can take years.



You are correct!
The timeframe for how long it takes to prepare varies from practice to practice. It should be a team effort with all departments working on the standards. Depending on changes that may need to be implemented, it may take as little as a few weeks to prepare.

The answer is False.
While it may take some practices longer to prepare for their first evaluation, it doesn’t have to take years, and you may be closer than you think. Many practices have worked through the standards and are ready to schedule their first evaluation within six months. Going through the standards in the self-evaluation tool is a great way to see how well your practice is already doing and to identify areas you may need additional work.

7/13: I’m a single doctor practice and can’t become accredited.



You are correct!
From the small town single doctor practice, to the bigger multi-specialty practice, AAHA accreditation is for everyone.

The answer is False.
We accredit all types of practices. From the small town single doctor practice, to the big multi-specialty practice, AAHA accreditation is for everyone.

8/13: I have an older building and can’t become accredited.



You are correct!
There are a handful of standards related to how your building is laid out or functions, but none of them require your building to be “new” or radically modified.

The answer is False.
There are a handful of standards related to how your building is laid out or functions, but none of them require your building to be “new” or radically modified.

9/13: I am already practicing at a high level of care and don’t need to become accredited.



You are correct!
No matter what level of care you and your team currently provide, the accreditation process will still help you raise the bar in one area of your practice or another. Accreditation provides team building, accountability, and a chance to review what you thought you were doing well and make it even better.

The answer is False.
No matter what level of care you and your team currently provide, the accreditation process will still help you raise the bar in one area of your practice or another. Accreditation provides team building, accountability, and a chance to review what you thought you were doing well and make it even better.

10/13: When prepping for surgery, the initial clip and clean of the surgical site must be performed outside the surgery suite.



You are correct!
This is one of the mandatory standards that must be met to be eligible for accreditation.

The answer is True.
This procedure decreases inadvertent contamination of the surgery suite and is one of the mandatory standards for being accredited.

11/13: We’re too busy, and I don’t have the help I need to become accredited.



You are correct!
AAHA practice consultants are more than happy to schedule a courtesy call walkthrough based on when they will be in your area. They can provide valuable feedback and tips to help you work towards accreditation when they can see how your hospital is set up and the procedures that are already in place.

You also have an accreditation specialist at AAHA available to answer questions, interpret standards, provide resources and examples, and help you and your team throughout the entire preparation process.

Involving your team in the process reduces the time it takes to prepare and provides an incredible team building opportunity that fosters pride, consistency and enhanced patient care.

The answer is False.
We can provide nonmembers access to a free, online self-evaluation tool that lets you view the standards and self-score your hospital. The standards are customized to your practice and all answers are saved in case you decide to move forward. You may be closer than you think to achieving accreditation!

You also have an accreditation specialist at AAHA who is available to answer questions, interpret standards, provide resources and examples, and help you and your team throughout the entire preparation process.

Involving your team in the process reduces the time it takes to prepare and provides an incredible team building opportunity that fosters pride, consistency and enhanced patient care.

12/13: I can’t become accredited until I have all the required written protocols.



You are correct!
Written protocols are a valuable training resource for your team and while it is important to have things in writing for the team and relief staff, the written protocols can be considered a “work in progress”. Choose the ones that you feel are the most important to your practice, or the ones that you’re already doing but may not have in writing, and start with those. If you are unsure where to start, the accreditation specialists can provide you with resources and templates for creating protocols.

The answer is False.
None of the standards regarding written protocols are mandatory. Written protocols are a valuable training resource for your team and while it is important to have things in writing for the team and relief staff, the written protocols can be considered a “work in progress”. If you are unsure where to start, the accreditation specialists can provide you with resources and templates for creating protocols.

13/13: I cannot pass an evaluation because I do not have an isolation ward.



You are correct!
While many practices have a dedicated room for the housing of potentially contagious patients, a temporary room or area is acceptable for most of the standards in the contagious disease section of the standards.

The answer is False.
Many practices do not have the physical space that allow for a dedicated isolation ward. Many standards in the contagious disease section refer to an “isolation area”, which may be a temporary room or area which can be converted to a place to temporarily house potentially contagious patients.

Congratulations! You have completed our accreditation quiz!


 

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