COVID-19 Update: AAHA staff is currently working remotely and will support our members virtually. All orders are currently shipping as normal.
Click here for more information.

Search Results for “pet insurance”

Showing 1-10 of 13

Vaccination resources

Engage clients with this fun vaccination poster! Clients can identify which canine persona matches their dog's lifestyle, then start the conversation on their unique vaccination protocol. 

Resource Center

2020 AAHA/AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines resources related to the guidelines for veterinary teams.

Non-core Vaccines for Pet Cats

Non-core vaccines are optional vaccines that should be considered in the light of exposure risk; that is, based on geographic distribution and the lifestyle of the cat. Optional or non-core vaccines for cats include FeLV ( for cats older than 1 year ), Chlamydia felis , and Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccines.

Core Vaccines for Pet Cats

Core vaccines are for all cats with an unknown vaccination history. The targeted diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality and are widely distributed. In general, vaccination for core diseases results in good protection.

Feline Patient Populations

For the purpose of creating specific, individualized vaccination recommendations based on risk of exposure, the Task Force has identified and defined the following feline populations based on their environment and lifestyle. The guidelines begin by discussing pet cats and then discuss a number of feline populations that are considered to be at relatively high risk of infectious disease exposure—namely, shelter cats, trap-neuterreturn/ trap-neuter-release cats, cattery cats, and foster cats.

2020 AAHA/AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines

A task force convened by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) and the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) examined the most current feline vaccination research and concluded that vaccine protocols should be tailored for individual cats’ unique lifestyles and infectious-disease exposure risks. These new guidelines encourage communication with the pet owner about how your team assesses disease risk and makes vaccine recommendations.

Free Web Conference

The decision to vaccinate is a balancing act between the potential risks of adverse events and an individual cat’s unique infectious-disease exposure risks. Join members of the 2020 AAHA/AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines task force to get the latest recommendations and best practices for assessing those risks.

Adverse Postvaccination Reactions

Although the administration of biological products is never entirely free of risk, currently available feline vaccines have an excellent safety record. That said, the true prevalence of adverse reactions is likely to be underestimated owing to underreporting by both veterinarians and owners. 49 Therefore, it is important to report any known or suspected negative events associated with vaccination.

Staff and Client Education

A veterinarian should assess every patient regardless of appointment type (wellness, acute care or follow-up visit) for current vaccination status based on age and lifestyle. Informed by this assessment, an individualized patient vaccination plan should be developed or modified and then discussed and agreed upon in collaboration with the cat owner.

Types of Vaccines

Vaccines, including those from different manufacturers that are licensed to protect against the same pathogen, should not be assumed as equivalent. Differences in processes and technology used to produce vaccines, as well as additives such as adjuvants, and vaccine route of administration influence efficacy, safety, and duration of immunity. Vaccines may be inactivated, attenuated live, or recombinant.

Refine Results


AAHA initiatives

keyboard_arrow_down keyboard_arrow_up

Medical

keyboard_arrow_down keyboard_arrow_up