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June 22, 2016

Obese dogs are four times more likely to rupture a cruciate than non-obese dogs

Extra weight puts undue stress on the body. In fact, obese canines are four times more likely to rupture a cruciate than non-obese ones, quote the authors of Canine Medical Massage: Techniques and Clinical Applications, citing a 2011 study published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice. But there are several things you can do, such as encouraging activity that fosters endurance but avoids straining the stifle with cutting and pivoting motions and more. Massage is also helpful, the authors note.

June 01, 2016

45% of practices increase their fees annually

If you cringe at the thought of raising your prices and the potential of losing clients as a result, keep in mind that 45% of practices do, according to Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints: Vital Statistics for Your Veterinary Practice. It’s part of staying profitable as the cost of goods, services, and labor increase. Additionally, keep in mind that clients don’t leave a practice because of higher fees. They leave because they move, they want a more convenient location, or they don’t perceive enough value for the price.

June 30, 2016

One-third of all cats and dogs are taking supplements in the United States

If your clients have been giving their pets nutritional supplements, they’re not alone. In fact, one third of all cats and dogs are taking supplements in the United States, at a cost of $1.3 billion annually, note the authors of Canine Medical Massage: Techniques and Clinical Applications, citing WebMD. Is that good or bad? That depends. The ingredients in a nutritional supplement can include vitamins, minerals, herb or other botanicals, amino acids, and more. However, the industry is not regulated.

June 16, 2016

The average price for a sick pet exam is $50.85

The average price for a canine and feline sick pet exam is $50.85, and exotic sick pet exams are a few pennies less, note the authors of The Veterinary Fee Reference: Vital Statistics for Your Veterinary Practice. If you’re charging more, unless you can communicate the value of that higher fee, guess what? With an existing client, you may lose the appointment. With a potential new client, you may never get her to walk in the door.

June 09, 2016

62% of pet owners rated their vet visits “high value”

A lot of a practice’s marketing focus is on getting new clients and their pets in the door. But you may be overlooking a very key group—your current clients. In an age when Internet reviews are the norm, are your current clients satisfied enough to spread the word? Not necessarily. In fact, only 62% of pet owners rated their vet visits high value, according to a 2007 American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Public Perception Survey cited in Practice Makes Perfect: A Complete Guide to Veterinary Practice Management. But there are ways to change that statistic.

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